Threats to Professional Licensure: State List

New Jersey

Other: Tracking Software
 Active Threat
Legislative/Executive Order/Regulatory: Legislative
Bill Number: A. 702; S. 1965
Status:
A. 702 passed first house on July 30, 2020 and was referred to the Senate State Government, Wagering, Tourism, & Historic Preservation Committee on August 3, 2020
S. 1965 – Introduced on 2/25/2020
Summary:

This tracking software legislation mandates that all state contractors use software to verify the amount of time they are working on a state contract. The software tracks total keystroke and mouse event frequency, and records a screenshot at least once every three minutes. It presents significant privacy and security concerns.

Other: Tracking Software
 Potential Threat
Legislative/Executive Order/Regulatory: Legislative
Bill Number: A.3989; S.2960
Status:
A.3989 – Died upon adjournment.
S.2960 – Died upon adjournment.
Summary:

This tracking software legislation mandates that all state contractors use software to verify the amount of time they are working on a state contract. The software tracks total keystroke and mouse event frequency, and records a screenshot at least once every three minutes. It presents significant privacy and security concerns.

Other: A legislative, regulatory, or executive action that falls outside other threat categories, including proposed elimination of other occupational licenses, that doesn’t directly threaten professional engineers but requires attention.
 Potential Threat
Legislative/Executive Order/Regulatory: Legislative
Bill Number: A 4273
Status:
Introduced in Assembly and Referred to Assembly Regulated Professions Committee on 10/20/2016
Summary:

Authorizes a regulatory officer to review, amend, and repeal any regulation, action, or decision made by a board that has the potential to displace competition. The bill is intended to provide antitrust immunity to professional and occupational licensing boards consistent with federal law, specifically the decision of the United States Supreme Court in North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission. In that decision the Court held that if a controlling number of a board’s members are active market participants in the profession or occupation the board regulates, then the board may invoke state-action antitrust immunity only if it is subject to active supervision by the state. NSPE and the New Jersey Society of Professional Engineers are actively tracking this issue to ensure that the best interests of professional engineers and the public health, safety and welfare are protected.