Blogs

February 11, 2013 - 14:14
This is the first in a series of blog articles that will examine issues pertaining to the licensure of engineering technologists as professional engineers in the U.S. This is a matter that is not often discussed in the engineering profession, and it is controversial among some professional engineers and among many engineering technologists. This first article describes the current status of how we license, or do not license, engineering technologists in the U.S. Future articles will contrast engineering and engineering technology accreditation criteria and curricula, and address how other...
February 5, 2013 - 10:06
The NSPE Board of Ethical Review is considering changes to the Society’s Code of Ethics and wants to hear your suggestions. The Board is specifically interested in suggested changes that reflect technology’s impact on engineering ethics and professional engineering practice, as well as other current professional practice issues. NSPE’s Code of Ethics has evolved over the years. One of the first references to the NSPE Code was in the May 1935 issue ofThe American Engineer. The Code was most recently amended in 2006, when a provision was added stating that engineers are obligated to...
January 29, 2013 - 10:51
I rarely use the words “porcelain” and “rooster” in the same sentence. But just a few days after Hurricane Sandy struck Manhattan, a porcelain rooster was the centerpiece between the worlds of the electric light and of urban darkness. Supply chains are the strategic corporate tool for conveying value from one end of society to the other. They are also subject to all flavors of disruptions given the level of complexity that many attain while in motion. Disruptions such as cargo delays, tangled logistics. And weather. Two days after Hurricane Sandy swept portions of the Atlantic...
November 21, 2012 - 08:59
The Washington Accord is an agreement among accrediting bodies in numerous countries, governing mutual recognition of engineering education qualifications and accreditation of engineering programs. When the accord was initially signed in 1989, the signatories included accrediting bodies from the U.S. (EAC of ABET), Canada (Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board of Engineers Canada), the U.K. (Engineering Council UK), Ireland (Engineers Ireland), Australia (Engineers Australia), and New Zealand (Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand). It has expanded significantly in recent years...
November 1, 2012 - 08:04
In the October issue of ASEE’sPrismmagazine, two engineering educators ask,“Why the double standard?”The double standard, they say, comes from the dearth of engineering faculty who hold a PE license while engineering colleges preach the importance of PE licensure to their students. The article is written by Rob Lang, P.E., a former dean and professor of civil engineering at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and Kirankumar Topudurti, P.E., deputy director of the Engineer Research and Development Center-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and an...
October 26, 2012 - 09:03
"Is engineering dying? It isn't clear, but in developed countries around the world young people would rather go to the dentist than go into engineering,"writes Dave Goldbergin the October issue ofPE. "Law, business, and medicine—just about anything but engineering—seem to be the preference of today's youth." Goldberg, a former professor of entrepreneurial engineering and president and founder of ThreeJoy Associates Inc., says the future needs more capable engineers, but something happens to students on their way to becoming engineers. He sees three reasons engineering may be dying:...
October 17, 2012 - 09:29
Prepared by the NSPE Licensure and Qualifications for Practice Committee In the past 40 years, the world has changed, and the nature of the practice of engineering at a professional level has changed with it. The planning, design, and implementation of engineering projects now takes place fully in a societal context, requiring extensive public and stakeholder input in project decision-making and heightened consideration of economic, environmental, public policy, code compliance, legal, and regulatory matters. More than ever before, this requires advanced professional practice skills on the...
October 10, 2012 - 09:39
The desk in the hotel room was bathed in the glow of a Cracker Barrel sign. This nearly ubiquitous restaurant chain had its sky-scraping signs located throughout most of the major highways of the United States and its promise of a wholesome country-style meal undoubtedly comforted many a weary traveler on lonely night drives throughout the American interstate system. I imagined that the parking lots of RVs and minivans, the back-lit gift shop windows and the rows of rocking chairs of Cracker Barrel stores would be modern day subjects for the artist Edward Hopper were he still alive, as...
September 13, 2012 - 11:00
About 15 years ago, the idea was hatched within the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying to enhance mobility of licensed engineers among states through what was termed “expedited comity.” This involved providing quick licensure for an engineer with a current “Council Record” from NCEES indicating that the engineer’s qualifications were consistent with the requirements for a “Model Law Engineer.” The success was nothing short of amazing. It used to take three to six months to obtain a PE license in a new state. In many states now, a Model Law Engineer with a Council...
September 12, 2012 - 09:30
This is the first in what will likely be a series of pieces addressing issues related to the licensure of structural engineers in the U.S. This article addresses how we currently license structural engineers and what initiatives are underway by various engineering organizations to maintain or change current licensure practices. Future articles will address the questions posed herein and alternatives that might be considered. This is a controversial topic within the engineering profession at the moment. This article, and those in the future, are not intended to be controversial but rather,...

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