NSPE Blog

June 15, 2015 - 13:09
By Mark J. Golden, CAE, FASAE Author and consultant Seth Kahan writes about three stages of evolution in associations: Transactional: Dues and the sale of products, services and publications generate the revenue to fund activities that advance and protect the profession as a whole. From the individual member’s perspective, however, it is still pretty much a WIITFM (“what’s in it for me?”) proposition. “Do the direct benefits I receive worth more than the money I am spending with the association?” The danger for organizations is this can degenerate into an effort to find and offer anything...
May 27, 2015 - 18:10
By President Harve Hnatiuk, P.E., F.NSPE It has been said that feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it. That being said, I want to say thank you for the opportunity to serve as the 76th president of NSPE. My thanks to my fellow NSPE officers, our board of directors, committee and task force members, House of Delegates members, state leaders, and everyone who has volunteered their time, talent, and treasure to move NSPE forward this year. Many, many thanks to the NSPE staff for its outstanding work. We are blessed with so many great individuals...
May 22, 2015 - 09:24
By Mark J. Golden, CAE, FASAE NSPE was formed in 1934 for the express purpose of enacting professional licensure laws in each of the 50 states. Forming an integrated partnership with state organizations, NSPE accomplished that goal by 1947. We picked up the District of Columbia and the US territories by 1960. Which raises the question: Do we need NSPE anymore? Can’t we just declare victory and go home? Unfortunately, no. Putting aside for the moment the valuable work that NSPE and its state societies perform to support, promote, and strengthen the license and support the licensed engineer...
May 22, 2015 - 09:12
By President Harve Hnatiuk, P.E., F.NSPE Early last year, I learned that it is many times wise to throw away preconceptions about certain things and try something different. I was having shoulder problems along with neck stiffness, coupled with back pain and an elbow that was very tender to the touch. Recently, it occurred to me that this experience has similarities to the pains that NSPE and many other organizations feel. I recalled going to my general physician a little over 20 years ago with a litany of minor issues for which I needed some relief. He admitted to me at the end of our...
September 10, 2014 - 10:44
The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying recently filed a “friend of the court” brief with the Supreme Court in a case that could have significant implications for state licensing boards. The case began with a complaint filed against the North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners by the Federal Trade Commission for sending cease-and-desist letters to nonlicensed teeth whitening providers. The board claims to be acting as a state regulatory body, ensuring patient safety; the FTC claims the board, comprised mostly of dental professionals competing against nonlicensed teeth...
August 4, 2014 - 13:54
Early Saturday, August 2, city officials in Toledo, Ohio, told about 400,000 residents to stop using their tap water because toxins created by algae in Lake Erie were found at a water treatment plant. This latest water emergency comes just seven months after drinking water contaminated by a chemical used to clean coal forced 300,000 residents of Charleston, West Virginia, to stop using their water. In the upcoming August/September issue of PE magazine, two people who are intimately familiar with the West Virginia case provide some engineering lessons learned. Here is the complete article...
November 19, 2013 - 09:07
How PE Licensure Has Changed Interesting article by Kathy Hart in the October issue of NCEES’s Licensure Exchange. Hart is the executive director of the Oklahoma State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, and she writes about the changes in licensure over the past 20 years. She mentions three in particular: Exam Administration “In 1993, all exams were on paper and used #2 pencils that the board staff sharpened by hand before every exam administration. Exams were shipped to the board office (in a not particularly secure manner) and a couple of days were spent...
February 5, 2013 - 10:06
The NSPE Board of Ethical Review is considering changes to the Society’s Code of Ethics and wants to hear your suggestions. The Board is specifically interested in suggested changes that reflect technology’s impact on engineering ethics and professional engineering practice, as well as other current professional practice issues. NSPE’s Code of Ethics has evolved over the years. One of the first references to the NSPE Code was in the May 1935 issue ofThe American Engineer. The Code was most recently amended in 2006, when a provision was added stating that engineers are obligated to...
November 1, 2012 - 08:04
In the October issue of ASEE’sPrismmagazine, two engineering educators ask,“Why the double standard?”The double standard, they say, comes from the dearth of engineering faculty who hold a PE license while engineering colleges preach the importance of PE licensure to their students. The article is written by Rob Lang, P.E., a former dean and professor of civil engineering at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and Kirankumar Topudurti, P.E., deputy director of the Engineer Research and Development Center-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and an...
October 26, 2012 - 09:03
"Is engineering dying? It isn't clear, but in developed countries around the world young people would rather go to the dentist than go into engineering,"writes Dave Goldbergin the October issue ofPE. "Law, business, and medicine—just about anything but engineering—seem to be the preference of today's youth." Goldberg, a former professor of entrepreneurial engineering and president and founder of ThreeJoy Associates Inc., says the future needs more capable engineers, but something happens to students on their way to becoming engineers. He sees three reasons engineering may be dying:...

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